Tips to Handle Inclement Weather On Race Day

Tips to Handle Inclement Weather On Race Day

One of the most difficult things about training and preparing for race day is not knowing what the weather conditions will be like on the day of the event. You can spend weeks and months training, putting in the time and effort to prepare your body for a marathon hoping to achieve your goal, but one thing that will always be outside of your control is the weather. You can never know if the race conditions will be hot, cold, sunny, overcast, or rainy until about a week before at the earliest. Because we cannot know the weather conditions for our race during training, how can we prepare for inclement weather? Below I have listed a few tips on how you can prepare yourself for a race when there are possibilities for different types of inclement weather.  

Is it Important to Know your Race Course?

Is it Important to Know your Race Course?

Is it important to know your race course? The quick answer. Yes. It's crucial. 

Although training is ongoing and the past weeks and month have been difficult to maintain a routine schedule, there is still reason for me to have confidence that I can complete the Peak to Creek Marathon and qualify for the Boston Marathon in 2016. 

The Good Side of Sore

The Good Side of Sore

Beep. Beep. Beep. The alarm clock goes off way to early and once again I reach to hit the snooze for what will be the first of three cycles. The problem is when I reach my arms wont quite make it to the phone and my legs seem tense. Soreness strikes again or delayed onset muscle soreness as my college textbooks say. 

When you think “sore” the word always carries a negative connotation. It seems unfair to me though. Why does “sore” get such a bad reputation? Sure it never ideal to be sore, but that does not mean that it necessarily is a bad thing.

Boston Beginnings

Boston Beginnings

There was emotion and tension as I reached the last mile of the 26.2 mile course. The crowd grew stronger as the streets became familiar to a runner that was unfamiliar with Atlanta. I knew I was nearing the finish line. There were lots of signs. My GPS watch, the crowd size, noise level, mile markers, and one man in particular. One man shouts out “Keep going! You can finish in the top 50!” The pain in my legs thought, “Ha, good one. 25 miles of running and you think this is a good time to joke! There is no way! “ It turns out he was not kidding, but that’s not the point.